Travel

The curious charm of cat city

A giant cat statue - sporting a green ribbon to celebrate the end of Ramadan - guards the entrance to Kuching's Chinatown. Photo / Jim Eagles
A giant cat statue - sporting a green ribbon to celebrate the end of Ramadan - guards the entrance to Kuching's Chinatown. Photo / Jim Eagles

FOR about 100 years, the city of Kuching, capital of Sarawak on the island of Borneo, was ruled by the legendary White Rajahs. Now it seems to pay homage to the domestic cat.

Take a tour of Kuching and you certainly see the more normal sights, such as a brilliantly decorated Chinese temple, an elegant pink mosque, traditional Malay stilt houses sharing the banks of the Sarawak River with a magnificent new state Parliament, a lively market and a Chinatown.

But it's cats and the memory of the White Rajahs - the three generations of Britain's Brooke family - which dominate.

The rajahs are the easiest to explain. The first, James Brooke, was given a huge slice of Borneo by the Sultan of Brunei as a reward for saving his kingdom from rebellious Dyak tribes, and he set himself up as its ruler in 1841.

Despite a spectacular construction programme fuelled by Sarawak's oil and gas riches, the highlight of the city is still the Astana - the elegant white palace on the banks of the river built in 1870 by the second White Rajah, James' nephew Charles Brooke, as a wedding gift to his wife.

The palace is not open to the public because these days it is the official residence of the Governor of Sarawak, but visitors can explore the superb gardens.

I spent a pleasant half-hour sitting on the bank opposite, sipping a cool drink from one of the riverside stalls, watching the little water taxis zip to and fro, admiring the palace's old-world charm and dreaming of a time when a young Englishman could make himself into a rajah.

If James was the city's founder, Charles seems to have been its builder, transforming Kuching into a modern western city with all the latest amenities of the time.

The plaque outside the Sarawak Museum - described by our guide, Taylor, as "one of the finest in Southeast Asia" - said it was built by Charles Brooke in 1881 to display the wildlife and handicrafts of Sarawak.

It certainly does that, displaying everything from a headhunter's house complete with skulls to an orangutan skeleton, a collection of blowpipes and a display of Borneo's hugely beaked hornbills.

On a poignant note, there is also a collection of swords used by the White Rajahs, including a Japanese sword presented to Vyner Brooke, the third rajah, who lost his kingdom to the invading Japanese in 1941.

After the war, Vyner returned to Sarawak and ruled for a further 75 days before bowing to the inevitable and ceding Sarawak to the British Crown. It later became one of the states of the Federation of Malaysia.

But if all that was straightforward, discovering why a large statue of a white cat, dressed in green, occupies pride of place in the heart of the city, was not.

Taylor told us it had been erected by the council of the Chinese-dominated South Kuching - the Malay and Indian-dominated north Kuching is a separate city - and was wearing green to mark the end of the Muslim festival of Ramadan.

"The cat is dressed in different costumes when there are different festivals," he said.

"So now it wears green for Islam, but if you come at other times you will see it wearing Chinese, Malay and Indian costumes."

Okay, but why a cat? And how come the boundary between the two cities held an impressive monument with cars carved on a column and four more cats guarding its base? And why was there a massive sculpture of a family of cats near the main market?

Kuching, Taylor said, was named after a fruit called cat's eye, which tastes like lychee. So the cat became the symbol of Kuching. Or at least I think that's what he said.

There was mumbling in our bus as we headed back to our ship, Orion II, berthed in the Sarawak River. Surely there must be more to it than that? If there was, Taylor didn't know.

I've since looked it up. According to Wikipedia, the city was originally known as Sarawak, but in order to distinguish it from the wider province, Charles Brooke named the place after the tidal river, Sungai Kuching, which flowed from the nearby hill of Bukit Mata Kuching, where there was an abundance of a fruit called green longan, but popularly known as mata kuching or cat's eye.

So Taylor was right.

>> Read more travel stories.

Topics:  borneo, travel, travelling


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Fighters get set for action

POWERFUL: Anton ’The Professor’ Zafir (right) in action during a muay thai fight at last year’s Airlie Fight Night event against Jamie Kearines.

Fighters get set for action

Police call on diver for help

ON CALL: Wayne Abraham was at work when the police called and asked for his assistance at a boat capsize situation unfolding in Bowen. Photo Inge Hansen / Whitsunday Times.

A dive instructor was called by police to help in the Bowen accident

Raising the roof

FUNKADELIC: Opiuo will heading to Airlie on May 27 to perform at Magnums Hotel.

Raising the roof

Latest deals and offers

Fighters get set for action

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS: The countdown is on for LA Entertainment’s Luke Anderson and his team.

Police call on diver for help

ON CALL: Wayne Abraham was at work when the police called and asked for his assistance at a boat capsize situation unfolding in Bowen. Photo Inge Hansen / Whitsunday Times.

A dive instructor was called by police to help in the Bowen accident

Come one and all for St Cath’s expo

CRAFTY: St Cath’s kids Kimba-Lee Simmonds, Sarah O’Reilly, Xanthia Thompson and Nikkia Goodall show off some of the crafts on offer.

Come one and all for St Cath’s expo

Raising the roof

FUNKADELIC: Opiuo will heading to Airlie on May 27 to perform at Magnums Hotel.

Raising the roof

Airlie Beach chef sped down Main St, nearly caused head-on

Timothy Whitehorn pleaded guilty to dangerous operation of a vehicle and possessing marijuana.

Man pleaded guilty to possessing nearly 300 grams of marijuana

Police: Collision believed to be cause of fatal capsize

TRAGEDY: Inspector Steve O'Connell commenting on the Bowen Harbour tragedy yesterday which left one man dead and two men hospitalised. Photo Inge Hansen / Whitsunday Times.

Inspector Steve O'Connell commented on yesterdays boat collision

Enjoying the Middle Ages at Pumpkin Festival

Entertainment at this year's pumpkin festival

Cameron Smith talks about 37 Origins

Cameron Smith, the most Origin games by a Queenslander.

Qld Captain Cameron Smith talks about his record-breaking 37 Origin appearances.

Inspector Steve O'Connell comments on the Bowen Harbour tragedy

Inspector Steve O'Connell from Whitsunday Police commented this morning on the...

Malcolm Turnbull and Barnaby Joyce tour Rockhampton sweet potato farm

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce visit a...

Sale nears on last large block of land in Coolum

The 43.37ha property on South Coolum Rd has sold.

South Coolum Rd property to be land banked

Caloundra’s former Centrepoint Buffet site up for sale

FOR SALE: The home of the old Centrepoint Buffet

Restaurant fined for unhygienic practices closed months ago