Aussie word stumps American woman

 

 

Ah, good ol' Aussie slang. One word, so many meanings.

We have a unique take on the English language - it's something that, unless you've lived here long enough, you will struggle to understand what on earth we're trying to say.

While our style continues to baffle many - including an American woman who created a 10-minute YouTube video titled, "Weird Australian habits I never realised I had" - another video has emerged, this time of a fellow American also confused by our slang.

The US woman, who goes by the name of StraySulli on TikTok, has released a string of clips detailing the Aussie language she doesn't understand, with the latest being the word, "travelling".

A US woman who lives in Sydney has created multiple TikTok videos about her Aussie slang struggles. Picture: TikTokStraySulli
A US woman who lives in Sydney has created multiple TikTok videos about her Aussie slang struggles. Picture: TikTokStraySulli


"I was supposed to be going to Sydney the other day and my friend who was also going there to meet up with her friend said, 'I'm going early in the morning, so I'll just give you a ride'."

"I was like, 'Hell yeah, I don't have to catch a train.'"

However, 15 minutes before her friend was meant to pick up her, she sent a "confusing" text.

"At around 7.45am she sent me a message saying, 'how are ya travelling'."

Taking the question literally, the American woman hesitantly responded, "with you?"

"But in my head I was like, 'We have talked about me travelling with you.' What the heck, was she already there?"

When her Aussie mate turned up and the woman hopped in her car, she explained it just means, "How ya going?"

Her hilarious post immediately caught the attention of Aussies, who chimed in to also explaining its meaning.

 

The phrase, ‘how are ya travelling’ was particularly confusing to her, as was ‘f***ing oath’. Picture: TikTokStraySulli
The phrase, ‘how are ya travelling’ was particularly confusing to her, as was ‘f***ing oath’. Picture: TikTokStraySulli

"It means are you running on time," one person clarified, while another wrote: "How are you going with getting ready" and "how are you tracking for time = how ya travvelin (sic)."

Others gave examples of experiences they too have had when talking to Americans.

"When I say 'all good' at the end of a sentence and Americans respond with how they are - didn't ask fam," one woman joked.

Another phrase she didn't quite grasp was "f***ing oath", asking fellow TikTok users for clarification.

"It means I wholeheartedly agree with the statement that has just been said," an Aussie man detailed.

"Means, damn straight, couldn't agree more," another added.

The American woman, who quit her job to travel the world, found herself having to stay in Australia due to the coronavirus pandemic.

 

She was also baffled when her roommate asked if she wanted to get ‘pissed’ thinking it meant ‘mad’. Picture: TikTokStraySulli
She was also baffled when her roommate asked if she wanted to get ‘pissed’ thinking it meant ‘mad’. Picture: TikTokStraySulli

RELATED: 'Bizarre' Aussie things confuse American

And since then, she has been uploading several TikToks videos about her Aussie experiences - all of which have generated hundreds of comments and thousands of likes - especially this one about her male roommate.

"Sometimes I can't really understand my roommate's slang words because I'm not from here," she said while holding a Kmart mug (showing her slow transition into Aussie life).

"So my roommate walks into my room and he goes, 'Ya wanna get f***ing pissed mate?'.

and I'm like, 'What, no why? Why would I want to get angry?'"

After repeating himself, she said, "I'm not mad, should I be pissed?"

 

After a desperate Google search she later realised he meant ‘drunk’. Picture: TikTokStraySulli
After a desperate Google search she later realised he meant ‘drunk’. Picture: TikTokStraySulli

Still confused, she decided to do a quick Google search of "Aussie slang" and the word "pissed" where she realised its true meaning.

"Drunk, oh drunkkk," she said laughing.

Many took to her video admitting that in Australia "we have a very complex dialect".

"I talk to my American friends all the time and we often get lost in translation - cracks me up every time," one TikTok user wrote.

"You'll soon catch on and you'll do great with the Aussie slang," wrote another, while another pointed out how well she mimics her flatmate's accent.

"This sounds accurate as hell."

Originally published as Aussie word stumps American woman


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