The Proserpine Court House
The Proserpine Court House Peter Carruthers

English tourist fined for drunken sexual assault

TEARS spilled down his face and his body shook silently as Edward Joseph Brooke Dixon heard what he had done in the early hours of June 29 in Brisbane's Fortitude Valley.

Proserpine Magistrates Court was told the solo traveller had been drinking heavily when he left a nightclub at 3.30am and met two women, aged 19 and 20.

Police prosecutor Senior Constable Hannah Beard said after a three-way consensual kiss, Dixon tried to kiss the women individually but the 20-year-old declined, saying she had a boyfriend.

Dixon propositioned the women for a threesome, which was declined, all the while repeatedly slipping his hand in the 20-year-old's pants, under her underwear.

"She said she tried to push him off, but initially couldn't,” Sen-Cons Beard said.

The women tried to convince the inebriated Dixon to go home to bed before walking away from him down the street.

He followed and continued to put his hand down the victim's pants, his actions caught on CCTV.

At one point he even took the victim's phone while she was standing with a group of people and typed out a message: "Want to (have sex)? No one has to know.”

The 21-year-old English tourist pleaded guilty to sexual assault on Monday after police identified him from the CCTV footage and arrested him while he was travelling in Airlie Beach.

PD Law solicitor Elizabeth Smith said Dixon had completed a bachelor degree in science and was due to start a "lucrative” graduate position with a multinational company whose name she had been instructed "not to say on the public record”.

"He has a girlfriend who he has been in a relationship with since the age of 16. She has been made aware of this offence and the fact he has been charged and has provided a letter of support,” Ms Smith said.

"He has no criminal history whatsoever.”

Ms Smith tendered six references on Dixon's behalf, which the court was told outlined his character and included community work as an athletics coach, lifesaver and dedication as a student.

Dixon also wrote a handwritten letter of apology to the victim which was given to police to pass on.

Ms Smith said Dixon had memory blackouts that night and could not recall trying to kiss the girls individually after the consensual three-way kiss.

"He does recall taking the phone and putting the proposition in her phone - he remembers it as a playful manner, not an aggressive one,” Ms Smith said.

"A conviction will impact his ability to travel to other companies and capacity to do his role, which might make him redundant.”

Magistrate Simon Young stressed the offence was very serious and could be considered out of character for Dixon.

"You repeatedly placed your hand down the back of a young woman's pants who did not invite such attention, she did not deserve such attention and she had told you on a number of occasions that your attentions were unwanted,” Mr Young said.

"It is apparent from the facts, the victim and friend exhibited a great deal of patience, tolerance and even compassion for you in your intoxicated state.

"This speaks to the sense of entitlement which young men have to young women and their bodies while intoxicated.

"This type of behaviour, while never appropriate, was somewhat more tolerated previously because of the potential consequences for women to be stigmatised for reporting such behaviour.

"We are fortunate to have moved on in society where women can report this behaviour to police and hopefully end this inappropriate sexual conduct.”

Dixon was fined $4000 with one month to pay or it will default to 45 days' jail. No conviction was recorded.


Shifting winds keep crews on even keel

Shifting winds keep crews on even keel

Shifting winds keep crews on even keel.

Iconic trail run attracts interstate runners to the region

Iconic trail run attracts interstate runners to the region

Iconic trail run attracts interstate runners to the region

Theatre plagued by 'seemingly endless compliance issues'

Theatre plagued by 'seemingly endless compliance issues'

No end in sight to cyclone damaged cultural hall reopening.

Local Partners