Ashleigh Clarke launched a new business Pallion Point in the height of the pandemic. Picture: Laura Thomas
Ashleigh Clarke launched a new business Pallion Point in the height of the pandemic. Picture: Laura Thomas

FINTASTIC FASHION: Hats put region’s water critters on show

A TYPICAL Whitsunday childhood spent on the water inspired the launch of a trendy, sun safe way to reel-in some of the most popular ocean dwellers to land.

Pallion Point was founded by travel guru and Sailing Yogi Ashleigh Clarke and gets its name from the northernmost point of Haslewood Island, an area renowned for reef fish.

The online store is the home of the ‘Fish Lid’, which is jovially defined as ‘a removable, sun-safe, fish adorned topper for your noggin’.

In layman’s terms, the store stocks caps adorned with a stitched reef fish typically found in the region’s reefs and waterways.

The hats feature a range of fish found around the Whitsundays. Picture: Laura Thomas
The hats feature a range of fish found around the Whitsundays. Picture: Laura Thomas

Ms Clarke launched Pallion Point when the pandemic set in after she lost work as a freelancer in the tourism industry.

However, the bleak origin story has blossomed into a thriving business that goes beyond just a trendy accessory.

There are three styles for sale now with a further six coming in the new year, which Ms Clarke said would be a conservation collection.

“I want to create more of a community than just a shop,” she said.

“I just want it to be a community of ocean lovers with a message that we all love the ocean and we all should be trying to protect it and do our little bit.”

Pallion Point sold out in the month following the launch and Ms Clarke had high hopes the run would continue in the lead-up to Christmas.

With a first-hand experience of the impacts of the pandemic on tourism jobs, she urged residents to consider buying local this silly season.

“Those sorts of side projects are massive for people,” she said.

“If you spend those extra couple of dollars supporting a small business or something local, it just goes further.

More stories

‘Embrace the wonk’: Turning clay into crafted masterpieces

Two Whitsunday destinations trending for Qld travel

New cafe offers shakes with a side of adrenaline

“You can save a few dollars buying from the big corporations or getting the sales, but the few extra dollars that it may cost to support a local business or a small business is a direct impact for other people at such a small cost for you.

“It means being able to buy more supplies to create or do whatever they’re doing.”

To reel in your own Fish Lid, visit the online store here.


Teen ‘shown the door’ after stealing hundreds from co-worker

Premium Content Teen ‘shown the door’ after stealing hundreds from co-worker

She was working as a cleaner in Airlie Beach when she took the cash

Whitsunday United farewells 2020 in style

Premium Content Whitsunday United farewells 2020 in style

It was a tough but successful season for the Whitsunday United Football Club.

Border opening gifts hope for bumper Christmas season

Premium Content Border opening gifts hope for bumper Christmas season

The Whitsundays welcomed visitors from southern states for the first time in months...