First Irukandji sting of season

A 15-YEAR-OLD boy has been discharged from the Mackay Base Hospital after being stung by a suspected Irukandji off Hook Island last week.

Daniel Aquilina was snorkelling with his family last Wednesday, January 14, when he removed his mask to clear it and was stung on the face.

CQ Rescue was called to the incident at 11am making this their first jelly fish task of the season.

Rescue Crewman Justin Craib praised Daniel's quick-thinking family for assisting the recovery effort by transporting him to Hayman Island.

"By getting the patient to Hayman Island it made locating and pick up a lot easier," he said.

After the CQ Rescue helicopter landed Daniel was treated on the scene while being prepared for transport.

Mr Craib said once treated and stabilised he was airlifted to the Mackay Base Hospital for further observation and treatment. A Queensland Health spokeswoman confirmed he was discharged on Thursday afternoon. The Irukandji is one of the most venomous creatures on earth and is prominent in the waters of north and central Queensland from October to May. Locals and visitors to the area during this time are advised to be stinger aware.

STINGER SAFETY

Wear stinger suits while in the water

If stung, leave the water and douse the stung area with vinegar to neutralise stinging cells.

Do not wash with fresh or sea water or rub with towels or sand.

Pick off any remnants of tentacles

Immediately seek medical assistance


Camm apologises after failing to declare shares

Premium Content Camm apologises after failing to declare shares

The Whitsunday MP said she was not aware a financial interest she held had not been...

Whitsunday airport to explore export market potential

Premium Content Whitsunday airport to explore export market potential

New economic opportunities for agriculture, tourism and small business through...

GREAT DEAL: $1 for the best local news, great rewards

Premium Content GREAT DEAL: $1 for the best local news, great rewards

Your support for local journalism is vital in our community