NEW FACE: Jeremy Callaghan is taking on the deputy principal role at Bowen State School from 2020.
NEW FACE: Jeremy Callaghan is taking on the deputy principal role at Bowen State School from 2020.

From mines to beaches: New deputy principal ready for Bowen

A FRESH face will be part of the leadership team at a Bowen school this year, as a new deputy principal joins its ranks.

Bowen State School has welcomed new deputy principal, Jeremy Callaghan, to its ranks for 2020.

The New Zealand born and educated teacher has moved to the Whitsundays after spending the last four years as head of curriculum at Middlemount Community College.

Mr Callaghan said having always holidayed to the Whitsundays, he was ecstatic to have the opportunity to put his roots in a place with the ‘most beautiful beaches around’.

“There’s so much history in the region as well, and I can’t wait to find out more

The educator comes with an interesting backstory, having spent three years in the mining industry when he landed in Australia as he paid off his student debts, before transitioning back to teaching.

NEW FACE: Jeremy Callaghan is taking on the deputy principal role at Bowen State School from 2020.
NEW FACE: Jeremy Callaghan is taking on the deputy principal role at Bowen State School from 2020.

He said working in a mining community came with a unique set of challenges, giving him a different outlook on tackling specific issues.

“There’s a very transient community in mining areas, so you have to work on issues like absenteeism,” he said.

“Coming to Bowen state, I’m looking, listening and learning to see how the school runs and seeing what we can build on.

“Our goals for the year are increasing community engagement with the school, improving reading writing and numeracy and making sure all our students are attending school.”

Mr Callaghan said he and principal Christien Payne would be working closely with the P & C and the school chaplain to find solutions for any families who might be struggling.

He said the best advice he could give a new student going back to school was to ‘be as nice as possible’.

He said it was important to have a strong social circle as it directly correlates to a better school experience and better grades, and the kinder you are to people, the more they would want to be your friend.

When asked the worst advice he had been given during his schooling, Mr Callaghan reflected on his senior years of high school.

“I loved music and playing piano and guitar, but I was recommended by my teachers to drop that and study economics and science,” he said.

“In the end I performed poorly in it because I had no interest. I think it’s incredibly important to let students flourish in their interests and not push them in a specific direction.”


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