Why law shouldn't hit hoons harder than drink-drivers

QUEENSLAND'S peak motoring body has questioned the balance of the State Government's anti-hooning laws, which are harsher on those doing burnouts than repeat high-range drink-drivers.

RACQ believes the laws, which came into effect in November, do not send a message of how dangerous a repeat high-range drink-driver can be.

While a driver can have their vehicle impounded for 90 days for a first offence under type 1 offences such as burnouts, a high-range drink-driver over 0.15 can re-offend twice before their car is taken away for 90 days.

"High-level speeding has much more severe road safety implications than the largely amenity-based concerns about hooning offences such as burnouts," RACQ executive manger technical and safety policy Steve Spalding said.

"Therefore, high-level speeding is more deserving of being a type 1 offence than a type 2 offence.

"Overall, RACQ did not support the State Government's amendment to the Police Powers and Responsibilities Act to enact the toughest hooning laws the country has seen."

The organisation believed the most-effective approach was increased enforcement of the existing laws.

> VARIANCE IN SPEEDOMETERS CREATES CONCERN <

Between November 1 and December 15, 7831 motor vehicle impoundment offences were reported across Queensland.

Acting Police Minister Andrew Powell said it was important to remember the new laws did not replace existing drink-driving laws.

"These laws allow for tougher penalties for hooning offences, evading police and people who repeatedly break the law by driving unlicensed or an unregistered vehicle, high-end speeding or drink-driving," Mr Powell said.

"The people of Queensland said they have had enough of people treating our roads like racetracks and shattering the peace.

"The new laws send a clear message: if you are willing to put your lives and the lives of other Queenslanders at risk by your reckless driving, you will be stopped.''

 

OFF THE ROAD

Burnouts, racing, speed trials, dangerous operation, careless driving, evading police, making unnecessary noise or smoke -

First offence: vehicle impounded for 90 days

Subsequent offence: forfeiture of vehicle

Impoundment and loss of vehicle can also apply to: unregistered or unlicensed driving, high-range drink-driving


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