Greenpeace says it has evidence of 16 illegal cases of shark finning.
Greenpeace says it has evidence of 16 illegal cases of shark finning. EPA

Illegal fishing by Taiwanese fleets widespread: Greenpeace

ILLEGAL fishing by Taiwanese fleets remains widespread and appears linked to labour and human rights abuses at sea, a new Greenpeace report says.

The report by Greenpeace East Asia found a culture of indifference was allowing illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing of tuna and sharks to continue despite international pressure on Taiwan to clean up its fisheries industry.

The European Commission issued a yellow card to Taiwan in October for failing to monitor illegal fishing activities in the Pacific and other oceans.

Taiwan was given six months to address the "serious shortcomings" in its fisheries management and legal framework or risk a red card blacklisting, which would mean a ban on fish products reaching EU markets.

Last month Taiwan's Government passed a draft bill and revisions to raise the maximum fine for illegal fishing activities in a bid to bring its policies in line with international law.

Read more at  ABC


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