EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME: Whitsunday trekkers Rod Dench from Midge Point,  Craig Spence from North Gregory and Wayne Priddle from Midge Point with the oldest living Fuzzy Wuzzy Ovuru Indiki during the Kokoda trail this week.
EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME: Whitsunday trekkers Rod Dench from Midge Point, Craig Spence from North Gregory and Wayne Priddle from Midge Point with the oldest living Fuzzy Wuzzy Ovuru Indiki during the Kokoda trail this week.

Kokoda touches Whitsunday men

THREE Whitsunday men endured the physical and psychological challenges of the Kokoda Trail this week to coincide with ANZAC Day.

The treacherous trail links the southern and northern coasts of Papua New Guinea through rugged terrain and tells the history of fighting between Australian and Japanese troops during World War II.

Craig Spence shared his story with the Whitsunday Times which showed there isn’t much that can prepare even grown men for the experience.

He joined a group of strangers who wanted to follow in the footsteps of those brave and gallant soldiers who protected our shores so many years ago against the invading Japanese imperial forces.

Locally, the three men, Craig Spence, Rod Dench and Wayne Priddle spent eight months training on the Great Whitsunday Walk but Craig said this didn’t compare to what they experienced in "the most demanding environment you could imagine".

"In comparison this was a walk down the road [the Great Whitsunday Walk] compared to the Owen Stanley Range in Papua New Guinea," he said.

"I personally found it the most demanding of mind and body I have experienced so far in my 49 years.

"How any of the Australian soldiers who fought here in 1942 survived the track, let alone being shot at, getting any number of diseases that were present at the time, and trying to find food, is truly amazing."

They learnt about out-of-the-way battle sites, ammunition dumps and plane wrecks while on the ground during the trek – things that aren’t in the books you read.The trekkers finished the trail with an ANZAC Day service at Bomana Cemetery.

Craig said it was this moment he truly felt proud of the brave young men from Australia who freely gave their lives to protect what we have now.

"We as their future should not let our future generations forget the suffering and sacrifice that they went through to give us the Australia we are proud of," he said.

As for advice for those who have thought about challenging themselves to this historic adventure, Craig said he urged people to do it as soon as they could.

"Be prepared for a never ending struggle and an emotionally up lifting ending," he said.


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