An Airlie Beach resident is urging the Queensland Government to not support a new coal mine near the Great Barrier Reef. Photo: File
An Airlie Beach resident is urging the Queensland Government to not support a new coal mine near the Great Barrier Reef. Photo: File

LETTER: Qld should reject proposed coal mine near reef

Clive Palmer wants to build a coal mine 10km from the waters of the Great Barrier Reef and the Queensland Government has said OK, we will consider it.

No, we will not consider it.

Someone needs to remind Clive and the Queensland Government that the only way coral and coal can exist together is to leave the coal in the ground.

This is a very bad idea on many levels.

First and foremost is global warming, fuelled primarily by the burning of coal.

The impacts on the reef are well known and devastating.

We do not need another new coal mine to add to the problem.

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As well, the world, including Australia, is quickly moving away from coal.

Clive should wise up and invest in renewable energy.

Secondly, this particular mine is located about 10km downstream of Broad Sound – a nationally important coastal wetland and one of Queensland’s largest fish habitats, with its waters part of the Great Barrier Reef world heritage area.

Now the Queensland Government said it would allow the project to move to the assessment stage.
Very bad idea.

The national Independent Expert Scientific Committee on Coal Seam Gas and Large Coal Mining Development (IESC) has provided advice to the Queensland Government on the proposal.

Clive Palmer wants to build a new coal mine near the Great Barrier Reef. Photo: File
Clive Palmer wants to build a new coal mine near the Great Barrier Reef. Photo: File

A key problem with the mine, the IESC said, included “significant and irreversible damage to internationally valued estuarine and near-shore ecosystems subjected to mine-affected water” as well as risks to creeks, pools, and the direct loss of 8km of waterways.

The IESC added: “The IESC cannot envisage any feasible mitigation measures, including offsets, that could safeguard these irreplaceable and internationally significant ecological assets and their associated water resources.”

Enough said.

Science and common sense make it very clear that there is no way forward for this mining proposal.

It is time for the Queensland Government to shut it down.


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