PANIC TIME: Parents can lose the driving plot at school drop-off.
PANIC TIME: Parents can lose the driving plot at school drop-off. Renae Droop

Perils of school 'pick-up panic'

THERE aren't many more days left in the school term and I, for one, am looking forward to a break from the dreaded school pick-up.

Ask any parent or carer and they will tell you navigating the heavy concentration of traffic near and around schools during pick-up and drop-off is a frustrating exercise. Most people are well behaved and obey the rules - but not all. A select few take 'pick-up panic' to a level that's left me in disbelief.

I've seen tantrums complete with blasted horns and waving arms, I've seen drivers cut off in order to get the perfect spot, lines of cars held up because another vehicle was stopped in the middle of a turning lane - and don't get me started on those who park on yellow marked lines.

What really worried me was the time I saw a car scoot across three lanes of traffic to perform an illegal U-turn at a set of traffic lights.

All the while, the surrounding footpaths bustled with hundreds of energetic schoolchildren eager to leave.

Although this behaviour is extreme, they're not rare examples of driving illegally, rushing and endangering young lives. It's not hard to be a little patient, to follow the rules and to put the safety of others, including our children, first.

We have only a few more weeks left in the school year, so let's go out on a good note.


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