Centenary Heights State High School, Ramsay St exterior for Gonski review funding, Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Photo Kevin Farmer / The Chronicle
Centenary Heights State High School, Ramsay St exterior for Gonski review funding, Tuesday, June 11, 2013. Photo Kevin Farmer / The Chronicle Kevin Farmer

Mum fined $1000 for enrolling kid in out of area school

FOR the second time in a month a parent has appeared before Toowoomba Magistrates Court after fraudulently enrolling a child in a city school.

When Highfields resident Glenys Margaret Holmes had applied to enrol her son with Centenary Heights High School she had put down her address as Long St which came within the catchment area of the school, Toowoomba Magistrates Court heard.

She later made a further application for enrolment, citing her address as having changed to a Snapdragon St residence in Middle Ridge which was also within the school's catchment area, police prosecutor Senior Constable Natalie Bugden told the court.

After an interview with the school body, her son was accepted and had started school before he was late one morning and the principal had been prompted to make inquiries.

Inquiries with the real estate agency responsible for the Middle Ridge residence found it was a rental that was vacant and that the 50-year-old had never resided there.

Further inquiries discovered she was living in Highfields, Snr Const. Bugden said.

Holmes, who had no previous convictions at all, pleaded guilty to one count of fraud.

Her solicitor John Davis told the court his client had been trying to stay one step ahead of a former partner from whom she had separated.

His client was a working single mother with few support friends and had found that the children of friends of hers were enrolled at Centenary Heights and that her son could get a ride to school with them.

She had since terminated her son's enrolment with the school, Mr Davis said.

Magistrate Bruce Schemioneck said it was the second time within a month a "queue jumping" parent had appeared before him.

Telling Holmes that catchment areas were imposed for good reason, Mr Schemioneck fined her $1000 but ordered the conviction not be recorded.
 


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