Robin Bristow is a spokesman for the Noosa Temple of Satan.
Robin Bristow is a spokesman for the Noosa Temple of Satan.

Satanists vow to use laws to preach in schools

A COAST satanic group has warned it could use the Religious Discrimination Bill to teach schoolchildren about the Dark Lord if the controversial laws pass parliament.

In a move of biblical proportions, Noosa Temple of Satan has made a submission on the Bill declaring it would "aggressively" use the laws to ensure the group could access all the privileges of the law including local, state and federal government grants.

At the weekend, the Lucifer worshippers declared the proposed federal laws a "waste of time" and "unnecessary" but vowed to use them to their advantage.

In a statement on behalf of the group posted on Facebook, Brother Samael Demo-Gorgon said Satanism had a message so powerful that new laws were not needed to protect it.

The Demogorgon from Stranger Things. Picture: Supplied.
The Demogorgon from Stranger Things. Picture: Supplied.

"From access to street evangelism, school breakfast programs, school chaplaincy programs, school personal development programs, school touring bands programs, school weekend camp programs, federal, state, and local grant programs, access to public facilities, etc. The list is endless," the statement read.

"We shall use our local federal member, commissioners, and courts to defend our new-found rights under this proposed legislation.

"Satan has great plans for the future of Noosa and Australia, and we intend to use every avenue available to us to reach our goals. Hail Satan!"

 

SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR – A group of Noosa Satanists have made a submission on the government's Religious Discrimination Bill.
SOCIAL MEDIA IMAGE DISCUSS USE WITH YOUR EDITOR – A group of Noosa Satanists have made a submission on the government's Religious Discrimination Bill.

Under the Federal Government's revised Religious Discrimination Bill churches, faith-based schools, hospitals and charities would be able to discriminate on hiring staff based on their religious beliefs.

The new draft bill also strengthens conscientious objection protections for religious groups and individuals.

RELIGIOUS BILL DRAWS IRE OF SPORTS STARS

The bill has drawn criticism from religious groups, sports stars and the nation's peak legal body.

Law Council of Australia president Arthur Moses SC said any law that sought to preference one right over another should be of concern to all Australians.

"It undercuts what we value as Australians," he said, in a statement.

"Rather than waste further energy on this flawed bill, the government should start a mature consideration of a Charter of Rights."

Submissions for the bill close on January 31.


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