Christopher Chan GLA260412GMBL

Study finds link between gambling and domestic violence

MORE than half of people seeking help for gambling problems reported family violence in the previous year, an Australian study of problem betting has revealed.

The study, by the University of Melbourne's Problem Gambling Research and Treatment Centre, screened 120 help-seeking people at clinics in Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania.

It found 53% of those seeking help reported some form of family violence in the previous 12 months, 44% of who reported victimisation.

The violence was more likely to happen due to "deeply-rooted and accumulated anger and mistrust".

Parents, current and former partners were the most likely to report being perpetrators and victims of family violence.

The study also found problem gambling generally preceded family violence.


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