‘Life sentence for me, suspended sentence for him’

 

GLENN Knappen was still in shock more than twenty-four hours after the man who left him with a permanent hole his skull walked from court on a suspended sentence.

Mr Knappen has spent the past 16 months with migraines, short term memory loss and difficulties working after Chase Danny Peter Brooks, 21, assaulted him outside an Upper Coomera service station about 1am on April 2, last year.

Brooks beat Mr Knappen so severely his skull caved in, his brain was exposed and he has a 6mm hole in the back of his skull which will, according to doctors, never heal.

Chase Peter Danny Brooks leaves Southport Courthouse with his solicitor Bianca van Heerden of Ashkan Tai Lawyers. Picture: Lea Emery
Chase Peter Danny Brooks leaves Southport Courthouse with his solicitor Bianca van Heerden of Ashkan Tai Lawyers. Picture: Lea Emery

Brooks on Thursday was sentenced to three months prison which was immediately suspended.

He had pleaded guilty in the Southport District Court to assault occasioning bodily harm.

"I am a bit disgusted with everything really," Mr Knappen said speaking to the Bulletin yesterday.

"I don't really know what sort of punishment would have been fair."

Mr Knappen repeatedly said he "didn't know what to say" and was "in shock" about the sentence.

The court proceedings left him so distraught, Mr Knappen was forced to come home from work early yesterday as he could not focus properly.

The injuries suffered by Glenn Knappen after the April 2 bashing. Picture: Supplied
The injuries suffered by Glenn Knappen after the April 2 bashing. Picture: Supplied

Mr Knappen said it was a life sentence for him due to the injuries so it surprised him the sentence was so small.

The solar energy worker told the Bulletin how his life had changed since the shocking attack.

He gets migraines regularly, needs to take more time off work due to his injuries and struggles to cope with the emotional stress the attack put on him.

"The mental impact left me in a very dark place," he said.

"I struggled with depression."

Mr Knappen said his recovery meant he was unable to drive for a long time, restricting his independence.

He was also unable to care for his young daughter every second weekend because his injuries stopped him from doing so.

Mr Knappen said because he was unable to work his financial situation became so tight he could no longer provide the same levels of child support.

While Mr Knappen could not work, it took six weeks before Centrelink benefits came through.

"I had to borrow money from family to cover basic expenses," he said.

Mr Knappen said he is now slowly getting back to as normal life.


Deep-water spots are delivering good hauls

Deep-water spots are delivering good hauls

Everything you need to know to catch a winner

Proserpine sugar industry backs action against India

premium_icon Proserpine sugar industry backs action against India

Members of the Proserpine sugar industry support government action.

Parading for the living Reef

Parading for the living Reef

Sea creatures and colourful corals come to life.