There are strict measures in place at Whitsunday Coast Airport as flights from Sydney begin to land tomorrow.
There are strict measures in place at Whitsunday Coast Airport as flights from Sydney begin to land tomorrow.

‘We are doing everything and more’

WHITSUNDAY Coast Airport's chief has assured residents that no stone will be left unturned in keeping the region safe following today's border reopening.

The Queensland border reopened at noon after more than three months of closures.

While it remains closed to Victorians, flights from Sydney will touch down in the Whitsundays from tomorrow.

As interstate travellers make their way into the region, Whitsunday Coast Airport's chief operating officer aviation and tourism Craig Turner said safety remained the top priority.

 

 

He said since flights commenced in mid-June, one traveller had been turned back for not displaying the correct documents before the border reopened.

While another traveller was moved into self-isolation in Mackay in line with guidelines for those transiting from other states and Mr Turner said they willingly complied.

"We are doing everything and more to ensure that people, when utilising the facility, can feel comfortable and confident," Mr Turner said.

"We have very thorough processes in place."

Increased police and security are among these processes.

A thermal imaging camera has also been installed at the airport to monitor the temperature of anyone arriving into the region via plane.

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Mr Turner said Whitsunday Coast Airport was one of the very few using this state-of-the-art technology.

"Every person arriving into our region is actually screened by this camera and it takes your temperature," he said.

"It's able to take 30 testings or temperature checks at a time.

"If someone comes through and they have a temperature, we isolate them and do a secondary test and there's a process to manage that.

"We decided to do it just to provide those arriving (with) peace of mind.

"It was a significant cost but to be able to manage those who are arriving and ensure that they're well and free of COVID-19 was a very important step for us."


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