Instrumental music teacher Idris Harries will be performing the world premiere of a clarinet concerto written especially for him.
Instrumental music teacher Idris Harries will be performing the world premiere of a clarinet concerto written especially for him. Claudia Alp

Whitsunday music teacher to perform at world premiere

INSTRUMENTAL music teacher Idris Harries will be jetting off to the United Kingdom on Saturday to perform the world premiere of a clarinet concerto written especially for him.

During the week, he shares 30 years of experience to about 150 students across Cannonvale State School, Proserpine State School and Proserpine State High School.

But at heart, he's always been a performer.

"I always had imagined being a performer. It's what I set out to be,” Mr Harries said.

"There was a point when my home education authority contacted and said: 'Do you fancy some daytime work?”, so I jumped at it.”

Mr Harries completed a Diploma of Teaching and has been either teaching or playing since.

But when a dental injury rendered him unable to perform, he spent about a year working with British composer Stuart Brown who wrote A Himalaya Concerto for him.

The 30-minute concerto was inspired by the 2015 Nepal earthquake which took almost 9000 lives and left almost 22,000 people injured.

Mr Harries will perform A Himalaya Concerto at a charity concert run by People Against Poverty, a global organisation dedicating to alleviating poverty, in Trowbridge, UK.

Money raised will be donated to the Nepalese people, who are still recovering from the devastating effects of the earthquake.

Mr Harries said having a purpose makes the performance even more worthwhile.

"I'm not a full time player so these opportunities don't come by too often. This is something different and there's a different outcome, a purpose. And that's what makes it really interesting for me,” he said.

Mr Harries will also perform the Australian premiere of the concerto in Brisbane in February next year and later in Sydney.

Both concerts will raise money for Nepal through Transform the Nations to stem the flow of people trafficking, by providing better prospects to generate incomes through better quality education opportunities.

Between concerts, Mr Harries said he hopes to continue he mission: increasing the profile of the arts in the Whitsundays.

"I would like to see more live art music here in the Whitsunday region. It's hard to describe because it's not quite classical music. But our problem is venues. It's not pub music,” he said.


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